djent

Here's the heaviest one-string metal instrument ever invented

by Mark Teo

January 9, 2014

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Call it metal’s answer to the tub bass. Or a marvel of D.I.Y. ingenuity. Whatever you want to call it, the Djentstick, a one-string instrument that’s making its round on YouTube, is the simplest and heaviest way to play a song.

Lambgoat picked up one the one-stringed instrument, which appears to be made from a single guitar string, an EMG81 pickup, and a slab of wood. Its Djent-lemanly inventor, Miguel Yépez, then ran the instrument through a Line 6 Pod XT multi-effects pedal, and recorded himself playing über-competently along to After the Burial’s “A Wolf Among Ravens.”

It’s a stripped-down feat of craftsmanship, but it seems unlikely that the Djentstick will ever take off—even if it seems, at first glance, practical, easy to play, and simple to produce. To date, the reactions to the instrument have been mixed.

“Keep up the good work, this is what happens if immaterialism meets METAL,” wrote idealistic YouTube user Kristoffer Björklund, who hailed the D.I.Y. approach to metal, a historically gear-obsessed genre. “I love you for making people understand, ‘That the gear is nothing without a player.'”

Others, meanwhile, lauded its creativity but believed that the instrument has its limitations—namely, it’s built for simple metalcore songs. We don’t disagree—we think it’d look pretty snazzy when paired with a crabcore lunge. “Pretty funny and creative idea for a makeshift instrument, but it really says something about the -core genre of music nowadays,” wrote user Lukoswan.

“I wouldn’t say djent is a subgenre of core, but rather progressive metal,” added self-serious poster Spencer Creaghan. “It may have been adapted into core genres, (many of which lose the polyrhythmic and odd time signature attributes), but I’d still call it progressive metal.”

Of course, D.I.Y. instruments aren’t anything new. Certain genres, like jug music, are created entirely from makeshift instruments, like washtub basses, saws, spoons, and so on. We, for one, would welcome the fusion of jug music and metal, if only to hear Emmure cover Mungo Jerry. For reals.

Tags: Music, News, After the Burial

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